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Back To Class - PHP

So you know the theory behind OOP, but don't really understandits applications? Well, it's time to take objects out of the classroom andinto the real world - this article demonstrates how OOP can save you timeand effort by building a PHP-based Menu object to describe therelationships in a hierarchical menu tree. And since the proof of thepudding is in the eating, it then combines the newly-minted Menu objectwith some of the most popular JavaScript menu systems available online toshow you how cool objects really are.

TABLE OF CONTENTS:
  1. Building an Extensible Menu Class
  2. Back To Class
  3. What's On The Menu?
  4. Children And Their Parents
  5. I Say Method, You Say Madness...
  6. Rounding Up The Family
  7. Saving My Bookmarks
  8. Reaching Higher
  9. Collapsing Inwards
  10. Extending Yourself
By: Team Melonfire, (c) Melonfire
Rating: starstarstarstarstar / 6
August 10, 2001

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Before we begin, let's just go over the basics quickly:

In PHP, a "class" is simply a set of program statements which perform a specific task. A typical class definition contains both variables and functions, and serves as the template from which to spawn specific instances of that class.

Once a class has been defined, PHP allows you to spawn as many instances of the class as you like. These instances of a class are referred to as "objects". Each of these instances is a completely independent object, with its own properties and methods, and can thus be manipulated independently of other objects.

This comes in handy in situations where you need to spawn more than one instance of an object - for example, two simultaneous database links for two simultaneous queries, or two shopping carts. Classes also help you to separate your code into independent modules, and thereby simplify code maintenance and changes.

A class definition typically looks like this:

<? class ShoppingCart { // this is where the properties are defined var $items; var $quantities; var $prices; ... // this is where the methods are defined function validate_credit_card() { // code goes here } ... } ?>
Once the class has been defined, an object can be spawned with the "new" keyword and assigned to a PHP variable,


$myCart = new ShoppingCart;

?>
which can then be used to access all object methods and properties.

<? // accessing properties $myCart->items = array("eye of newt", "tail of lizard", "wings of bat"); $myCart->quantities = array(9, 4, 14); // accessing methods $myCart->validate_credit_card(); ?>


 
 
>>> More PHP Articles          >>> More By Team Melonfire, (c) Melonfire
 

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