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6.1.4 The MySQL Benchmark Suite - MySQL

While optimization is possible with limited knowledge of your system or application, the more you know about your system, the better your optimization will be. This article, the first of two parts, covers some of the different points you will need to know for optimizing MySQL. It is excerpted from chapter six of the book MySQL Administrator's Guide, by MySQL AB (Sams, 2004; ISBN: 0672326345)

TABLE OF CONTENTS:
  1. MySQL Optimization, part 1
  2. 6.1.4 The MySQL Benchmark Suite
  3. 6.2.1 EXPLAIN Syntax (Get Information About a SELECT)
  4. 6.2.2 Estimating Query Performance
  5. 6.2.6 How MySQL Optimizes IS NULL
  6. 6.2.9 How MySQL Optimizes ORDER BY
  7. 6.2.12 Speed of INSERT Queries
  8. 6.2.15 Other Optimization Tips
By: Sams Publishing
Rating: starstarstarstarstar / 58
April 13, 2005

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This section should contain a technical description of the MySQL benchmark suite (and crash-me), but that description has not yet been written. Currently, you can get a good idea of the benchmarks by looking at the code and results in the sql-bench directory in any MySQL source distribution.

This benchmark suite is meant to tell any user what operations a given SQL implementation performs well or poorly.

Note that this benchmark is single-threaded, so it measures the minimum time for the operations performed. We plan to add multi-threaded tests to the benchmark suite in the future.

To use the benchmark suite, the following requirements must be satisfied:

  • The benchmark suite is provided with MySQL source distributions. You can either download a released distribution from http://dev.mysql.com/downloads/, or use the current development source tree (see Section 2.3.3, "Installing from the Development Source Tree").

  • The benchmark scripts are written in Perl and use the Perl DBI module to access database servers, so DBI must be installed. You will also need the server-specific DBD drivers for each of the servers you want to test. For example, to test MySQL, PostgreSQL, and DB2, you must have the DBD::mysql, DBD::Pg, and DBD::DB2 modules installed. See Section 2.7, "Perl Installation Notes."

After you obtain a MySQL source distribution, you will find the benchmark suite in its sql-bench directory. To run the benchmark tests, build MySQL, then change location into the sql-bench directory and execute the run-all-tests script:

shell> cd sql-bench
shell> perl run-all-tests --server=server_name

server_name is one of the supported servers. To get a list of all options and supported servers, invoke this command:

shell> perl run-all-tests --help

The crash-me script also is located in the sql-bench directory. crash-me tries to determine what features a database supports and what its capabilities and limitations are by actually running queries. For example, it determines:

  • What column types are supported

  • How many indexes are supported

  • What functions are supported

  • How big a query can be

  • How big a VARCHAR column can be

You can find the results from crash-me for many different database servers at http://dev.mysql.com/tech-resources/crash-me.php. For more information about benchmark results, visit http://dev.mysql.com/tech-resources/benchmarks/.

6.1.5 Using Your Own Benchmarks

You should definitely benchmark your application and database to find out where the bottlenecks are. By fixing a bottleneck (or by replacing it with a "dummy module"), you can then easily identify the next bottleneck. Even if the overall performance for your application currently is acceptable, you should at least make a plan for each bottleneck, and decide how to solve it if someday you really need the extra performance.

For an example of portable benchmark programs, look at the MySQL benchmark suite. See Section 6.1.4, "The MySQL Benchmark Suite." You can take any program from this suite and modify it for your needs. By doing this, you can try different solutions to your problem and test which really is fastest for you.

Another free benchmark suite is the Open Source Database Benchmark, available at http://osdb.sourceforge.net/.

It is very common for a problem to occur only when the system is very heavily loaded. We have had many customers who contact us when they have a (tested) system in production and have encountered load problems. In most cases, performance problems turn out to be due to issues of basic database design (for example, table scans are not good at high load) or problems with the operating system or libraries. Most of the time, these problems would be a lot easier to fix if the systems were not already in production.

To avoid problems like this, you should put some effort into benchmarking your whole application under the worst possible load! You can use Super Smack for this. It is available at http://jeremy.zawodny.com/mysql/super-smack/. As the name suggests, it can bring a system to its knees if you ask it, so make sure to use it only on your development systems.

6.2 Optimizing SELECT Statements and Other Queries

First, one factor affects all statements: The more complex your permission setup is, the more overhead you will have.

Using simpler permissions when you issue GRANT statements enables MySQL to reduce permission-checking overhead when clients execute statements. For example, if you don't grant any table-level or column-level privileges, the server need not ever check the contents of the tables_priv and columns_priv tables. Similarly, if you place no resource limits on any accounts, the server does not have to perform resource counting. If you have a very high query volume, it may be worth the time to use a simplified grant structure to reduce permission-checking overhead.

If your problem is with some specific MySQL expression or function, you can use the BENCHMARK() function from the mysql client program to perform a timing test. Its syntax is BENCHMARK(loop_count,expression). For example:

mysql> SELECT BENCHMARK(1000000,1+1);
+------------------------+
| BENCHMARK(1000000,1+1) |
+------------------------+
|           0            |
+------------------------+
1 row in set (0.32 sec)

This result was obtained on a Pentium II 400MHz system. It shows that MySQL can execute 1,000,000 simple addition expressions in 0.32 seconds on that system.

All MySQL functions should be very optimized, but there may be some exceptions. BENCHMARK() is a great tool to find out if this is a problem with your query.

This article is excerpted from MySQL Administrator's Guide, by MySQL AB (editor) (Sams, 2004; ISBN 0672326345). Check it out at your favorite bookstore today. Buy this book now.



 
 
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