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MySQL Administration

MySQL Administration correctly administering the MySQL server, including the manipulation the privilege system, and making intelligent decisions about the capabilities (permissions) given to users.

TABLE OF CONTENTS:
  1. MySQL Administration
  2. The Privilege System
  3. A Real-Life example
  4. More Basics
By: W.J. Gilmore
Rating: starstarstarstarstar / 21
March 30, 1999

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So you've finally correctly installed the MySQL server. The next step is to configure the server to handle clients, in addition to making the server a secure one. Yet how does one go about the addition of clients, in addition to providing necessary privileges for the client's intended use of the server? This article will focus upon some of the most daunting (yet easy and important!) tasks of correctly administering the MySQL server, including the manipulation the privilege system, and making intelligent decisions about the capabilities (permissions) given to users.

I will make the assumption that you have at least a rough knowledge of SQL basics. For example, what is an INSERT, SELECT, or UPDATE command. Also, you should have a basic understanding of the Unix-flavored directory structure before continuing this article.

Have you correctly installed MySQL?

For those who are not sure if MySQL has been correctly installed, follow along with the below commands. (Don't worry if you have no clue as to what is taking place. We will discuss these concepts throughout the article):


$ cd /usr/local/bin $ ./mysqlshow +--------------+ | Databases | +--------------+ | mysql | +--------------+

Assuming that checks out, try:


$ ./mysqlshow mysql Database: mysql +----------+ | Tables | +----------+ | db | | host | | user | +----------+

And finally:


$ ./mysql -e "select host,db,user from db" mysql +------+----------+------+ | host | db | user | +------+----------+------+ | % | test | | | % | test_% | | +------+----------+------+

Assuming the above tests have produced the expected output, we can now begin discussing the concepts that one must understand to fully benefit from MySQL's efficient administration system. If the results were not the same as those seen above:
  1. Have you executed MYSQL_INSTALL_DB? If you have never heard of the command, check out the MySQL documentation.
  2. If you have in fact executed MYSQL_INSTALL_DB, again, consult the docs, as there are a number of possible problems arising from the command that are out of the scope of this article.

Assuming everything is in order, and MySQL has in fact been installed correctly, let's take a look at the dynamics behind MySQL administration.


 
 
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